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Episode Notes | Transcript | AskTheGuest

 Hi Fives (5 Highlights)   Click for 2.5-Minute Listen

David Jenemann is Professor of English and the Dean of the University of Vermont Honors College in Burlington, Vermont.

Prof. Jenemann did not grow up dreaming of being the Dean of an Honors College. He didn’t think he’d be working with such extraordinary people.

Yet today, he is the Dean of UVM Honors College -  which traces its model to the philosopher, education reformer & an 1879 graduate of UVM, John Dewey.

In this podcast, Dean Jenemann introduces the UVM Honors College, Highlights of Key Programs, How to Apply, UG Research, Study Abroad and Career Opportunities.

Hi-Fives from the Podcast are:

  1. Faculty
  2. Program Highlights
  3. Student Participation
  4. How to Apply
  5. Scholarships

Episode Notes

Episode Title: Dean David Jenemann of the University of Vermont Honors College: A Community of Inquiry.

Prof. Jenemann did not grow up dreaming of being the Dean of an Honors College. He didn’t think he’d be working with such extraordinary people either.

Today, he is the Dean of University of Vermont Honors College -  which traces its model to the philosopher, education reformer & an 1879 graduate of UVM, John Dewey.

In this podcast, Dean Jenemann introduces the UVM Honors College, Highlights of Key Programs, How to Apply, UG Research, Study Abroad and Career Opportunities.

In particular, we discuss the following with him:

  • Dean David Jenemann’s Background
  • UVM Honors College
  • Student Requirements
  • Career Opportunities

Topics discussed in this episode:

  • Introducing Dean David Jenemann, UVM Honors College [0:55]
  • Hi Fives - Podcast Highlights [2:07]
  • Professional Background [4:37]
  • About UVM Honors College [5:42]
  • Faculty [8:20]
  • Program Highlights [10:02]
  • UG Research/Thesis [11:31]
  • Research Grants [12:51]
  • Summer Programs [14:27]
  • Student Participation in Summer Programs [15:39]
  • Study Abroad [17:40]
  • How to Apply [22:03]
  • Student Body Profile [24:45]
  • Scholarships [26:08]
  • Career Opportunities [28:07]

Our Guest: David Jenemann is Professor of English and the Dean of the University of Vermont Honors College. Dean Jenemann received a Bachelor’s degree in English Language and Literature from Swarthmore College. He then earned his PhD in Comparative Studies in Discourse and Society from the University of Minnesota.

Memorable Quote: “We really want a thesis to be appropriate to a student's major and appropriate to their discipline, as well as a project that they're excited about taking ownership of and seeing it through from germ of an idea to completion.” Dean Jenemann.

Episode Transcript: Please visit Episode’s Transcript.

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Episode Transcript

Transcript of the episode’s audio.

<Start Snippet> David J  0:14  

we're about 95% of our students who are in either graduate school or a profession related to their major within six months after after graduating. And, and I always say to parents and students when when they come to visit, I just want them all to know that that other 5% was me. I, I worked as a barista after college for a couple of years. And, and, you know, you know, the fact that I'm the Dean of the Honors College should hopefully give them comfort that even if they don't go immediately to graduate school, it's all going to work out okay.

Venkat  0:55  [Introducing Dean David Jenemann, UVM Honors College]

That is David Jenemann, Professor of English and the Dean of the University of Vermont Honors College in Burlington, Vermont.

Hello, I am your host, Venkat Raman.

Prof. Jenemann did not grow up dreaming of being the Dean of an Honors College.

He didn’t think he’d be working with such extraordinary people.

Yet today, he is the Dean of UVM Honors College -  which traces its model to the philosopher, education reformer & an 1879 graduate of UVM, John Dewey.

Venkat Raman  1:35

In this podcast, Dean Jenemann introduces the UVM Honors College, Highlights of Key Programs, How to Apply, UG Research, Study Abroad and Career Opportunities.

Before we jump into the podcast, here are the Hi-Fives,  Five Highlights from the podcast:

David J  2:07  [Highlights - Hi Fives]

[Faculty]

We draw faculty from every academic unit around campus, so we have great working relationships with the other Dean's at the university. And we really liked give students the opportunity to take courses in a in a in a wide range of fields.

[Program Highlights]

We have classes taught by the former president of the university who is a noted constitutional law scholar he does a course on the First Amendment. We have a course taught by a member of the National Academy of Sciences, from engineering who kind of teaches a hydrology for non hydrologist class which is very popular.

[Student Participation]

I've been working really closely with the College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences here at UVM. To have students think about some of the summer internships they they do as as being the springboard to their thesis project. And yeah, and thereby counting, that internship is research.

 

[How to Apply]

We try and stay between eight and 10% of the of the first year class. There are two ways into the Honors College currently. One is that students are invited. We look at the application pool as a whole. And we try to identify that top eight or 10% of the entering class. But have it look like the rest of the university. So

[Scholarships]

Students at in the Honors College typically receive the one of the highest merit awards that the university offers pretty much all of the students at in the eyes college or Presidential Scholars and that's the highest level of merit award that that students have.

Venkat Raman  4:00

These were the Hi5s, brought to you by “College Matters. Alma Matters.”

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

Venkat Raman  4:13

Now, I'm sure you want to hear the entire podcast with Dean Jenemann.

So without further ado, here is Dean David Jenemann!

-----------------

Venkat Raman  4:24  

If you're ready, we can jump right in.

David J  4:26  

Yep. Excited to start. Cool.

Venkat Raman  4:29  

So maybe before we dive into the Honors College, we can you know if you could share your background, tell us a little bit about yourself. That'd be great.

David J  4:37  [Professional Background]

Sure, so I am the Dean of the University of Vermont Honors College. I've been in this role since 2019. Prior to that, I was a professor in the English department and the program in film and television studies. My school background is that I've had a mix of Have the very small and the very large I went to Swarthmore College as an undergraduate, which at the time, had about 1300 students. And then worked for a couple of years for an academic publishing company, and went back to graduate school, which at that time was about 50,000 students. So I've seen seen, you know, as small and as big as they get, and the University of Vermont, which has about a dozen undergraduates is a is a nice in between spot.

Venkat Raman  5:32  

So tell us about the UVM Honors College. I mean, what are some of the highlights and maybe a little bit of history or background as well.

David J  5:42  [About UVM Honors College]

So the Honors College has been in existence since 2004. It evolved from a program called the John Dewey Honors Program. And John Dewey, the noted early 20th century, educational reformer philosopher writer, was a graduate of the University of Vermont, he graduated in 1879. And Dewey's legacy informs a lot of what the Honors College does. So Dewey had this idea that that society's thorny problems could really only be addressed by communities of of dedicated Enquirer's. And, and that meant that people had to come from all of the academic disciplines, as well as because Dewey was, was a forward thinker and a radical for his time, every race, creed and gender. So, Dewey's embodiment of what we call a community of inquiry is something that we take as the model for what Honors College students do at the at the University of Vermont today. So we're a four year residential college, with students from every undergraduate major, every undergraduate unit on campus. So we've got students who are in engineering, we've got students who are in environmental studies, we've got English and theatre majors, and they all live together. And the honors college for the first two years, while they're taking one seminar per semester with us, that introduces students to contemporary challenges, looks at historical and societal problems from a an interdisciplinary standpoint, and prepare students to engage in undergraduate research. So that in their junior and senior year, they take on a faculty mentor, and a capstone research project that they see from the germ of an idea through development to completing a thesis. And at the end of those four years of coursework research, thesis writing, they graduate as honors college scholars.

Venkat Raman  8:11  

So is the faculty drawn from across the university? Or do you have some hybrid or how's that structured?

David J  8:20  [Faculty]

Yep, so the only two faculty members who are permanently in the Honors College are myself, the dean and my associate dean. Otherwise, we draw faculty from every academic unit around campus. So we have great working relationships with the other Dean's at the university. And we really liked give students the opportunity to take courses in a in a in a wide range of fields. The courses that the students do in the Honors College are integrated with our core curriculum. So when a student takes their first year seminar with us, it's also the foundational writing and information literacy class, or the writing and information literacy class that every student would otherwise have to take at the university. Many of our courses, about 40% of our courses count for one of the diversity requirements on classes on campus. And then other classes are going to are going to fill the requirement for literature classes or math classes or science classes as well. So we really want the students to think about the Honors College courses as as special because we're the only place they can take some of these these topics, but but not extra work that they have to do because it's integrated with the curriculum already.

Venkat Raman  9:43  

So So what are some of the highlights or headline programs? You mentioned there are some special topics that they could only take the Honors College. What are some, ones that you're finding, popular or maybe seminal in some sense,

David J  10:02  [Program Highlights]

yeah. So they really range. We we have we have classes taught by the former president of the university, who is a noted constitutional law scholar, he does a course on the First Amendment. We have a course taught by a member of the National Academy of Sciences, from engineering who kind of teaches a hydrology for non hydrologist class, which is very popular, it turns out. And this year, we're starting a new, a new series of courses for all first year students we've always had had contemporary topics as as part of our makeup. Yeah, but But now, each first year student will take a class, specifically on a contemporary challenge. Among the courses, we're going to be teaching our ones on the opioid crisis, we're going to offer a course on reproductive rights, we're going to do one on on street children and the Roma population in Europe. And I'm going to be teaching one on authoritarianism and populism, because that's my area of research.

Venkat Raman  11:13  

You mentioned that mentioned undergraduate research and Capstone. Is that, I'm assuming every Honors College student has to do some sort of research and thesis or is it there's some sort of a requirement based on the major?

David J  11:31  [UG Research/Thesis]

yes to graduate as an Honors College scholar, students do have to complete a thesis. Okay. But our, our philosophy of the thesis is that unlike when I was an undergraduate student, and a thesis was a pretty Proform, a 50, to 70 page essay, you wrote that maybe two people read and then went in the drawer for forever. We really want a thesis to be appropriate to a student's major and appropriate to their discipline, as well as a project that they're excited about taking ownership of and seeing it through from from germ of an idea to completion. Because while we have a lot of students who go on to graduate school and will do graduate level research, the idea that we want to convey with a thesis is that in having a project that you manage, and develop all the way through, you're also developing transferable skills that will be pertinent to any professional experience you have down the road.

Venkat Raman  12:46  

Do you help with research grants and are those kinds of programs in place?

David J  12:51  [Research Grants]

Yep. So great question. Part of the Honors College is, is a university wide office called the fellowships opportunities and undergraduate research office. And that team who works with me, is there to support undergraduate research across campus. And because so many of the Honors College students are doing that research, it made sense to situate it here in the Honors College. And they, they distribute about $400,000 a year in research funding for undergraduates. And that funding takes a lot of different forms. So we have some students who need research materials and ranging from, you know, some of the software that they're using to run data analysis to a student who mistakenly had an order of mealworms. For some, for some, some animals he was working with deliver to our office to, you know, you know, material that they're using in in some of the art and design projects that they're doing. So we certainly want to support the material needs of research. We also support students with travel grants to travel to where they're doing their research, as well as to conferences to present their research professionally.

Venkat Raman  14:19  

What kind of summer programs are you supporting or other students on their own with respect to internships and things of that nature?

David J  14:27  [Summer Programs]

So through the four office, we run, summer undergraduate research fellowships, and those are between $3,500 and $5000 grants to students to do their research. Those those grants sometimes come also with with some professional development funding for the faculty mentors, so we provide about $1,500 to the faculty to help support them, mentoring and supporting our students. But We run, we try and run as many of them as we can. Some of them are coming directly out of the the fellowships opportunities on the graduate research budget, and some of them are through partnerships with the undergraduate colleges. So we really believe that every student should have an opportunity research project, and we try to create the conditions of possibility to make that happen, both in the Honors College and around the university.

Venkat Raman  15:31  

So what fraction of the Honors College students are you finding, do these summer research programs? Roughly?

David J  15:39  [Student Participation in Summer Programs]

That's a good question. Typically, we would run a few dozen, during the summer. Most of the students are doing their research during the academic year. However, one of the things that we've been really excited about and invested in is having students think about their pre professional experiences as having a research component. So I've been working really closely with the College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences here at UVM. To have students think about some of the summer internships they they do as, as being the springboard to their thesis project. And yeah, and thereby counting, that internship is research. Because, you know, I can, I can guarantee you that some of the things that the students are involved in, in some of the, the really cool and, and, and forward thinking companies, even here in the Burlington area, are going to give them as much or more research experience than they would get taking a class on campus. And, and, and so, you know, engineering is one place where that's happening. Another place where that's happening is in our department and psychological sciences, where students are doing some of their, their clinical internships as a springboard to their research. So in terms of the number of summer programs we run, we ourselves are supporting that that couple of dozen, but we're seeding opportunities around the campus for students to think about their their internships as as integrated to their research as well.

Venkat Raman  17:33  

One other question, and then we can talk a little bit about the student body. How about study abroad?

David J  17:40  [Study Abroad]

Yeah, I am a firm proponent in in study abroad. And I really encourage students to, to not only explore those opportunities, but to think about exploring them early in their academic career. We help facilitate that, here at UVM. By having two programs that our Honors College specific one is at is through Principia at the University of Glasgow in Scotland, and the other is at Maastricht in the Netherlands. And, and those the Maastricht program is is is a lot of fun for us because it's a bilateral program, where we have students from Maastricht coming to UVM and participate in the Honors College and we get to know them and, and to meet our students. And then we send students there as well. And we've been able to reinstitute those after COVID, we had to put them on hiatus for a couple of years. But now they're back up and running again. But if a student doesn't want to go to Glasgow, or they don't want to go to Maastricht, we work really closely with our Office of International Education, and encourage students to think about the broad range of study abroad opportunities. For some students that works really well with their academic schedule to do a semester abroad. Sometimes you're abroad. But for some students they do as a summer program or a winter term course. I just really think that that opportunity for an international experience is so, so valuable to a student experience and I I reflect on my own undergraduate career where I studied abroad, and as well as in graduate school where I I ended up having a fellowship to study abroad. And I think, you know, to the extent that I see that as having set me on the path to where I am today, I think it's really important for students to, to find ways to do that themselves. And we really work very closely with the programs that have highly structured majors to help the students plan for that. At so they can get their requirements in and still the study abroad experience.

Venkat Raman  20:06  

Absolutely. Now, again, what, what kind of participation are you finding from the Honors students with respect to study abroad?

David J  20:15  

Oh, goodness, it's going to vary from from program to program and year to year? You know, I would say, I don't know the exact number for the Honors College. But I would say maybe 25% of the students.

Venkat Raman  20:34  

Cool. Oh, yeah. Just to get a feel. I mean, I'm always curious why students don't take advantage. And like you mentioned, you know, there's coursework, there's cost, there are other factors that come in, but yeah, absolutely.

David J  20:52

Yeah. Yeah. And, and, you know, I think the the, one of the things I think globally about study abroad is, as you said, the the cost of it. And, you know, we we take very seriously the, the fact that there is a financial burden being at a university, and and when we advise students about study abroad, we we encourage them to really get to know the program that they're going on and make sure that it either is, is integrated with the the university's Office of International Education so that they're not having to pay extra for it, or that their financial aid package will contribute to their their study abroad experience. But, but that I think, is a is a barrier for some students, certainly.

Venkat Raman  21:51  

Let's talk a little bit about the students. I mean, what fraction of the UVM student body is Honors college? And then how do they? How do they get in? How do they apply? And how do they get in?

David J  22:03  [How to Apply]

Yeah, so currently, this year's first year class is about 8% of the entering class, we try and we try and stay between eight and 10% of the of the first year class. There are two ways into the Honors College currently, one is that students are invited, we look at the application pool as a whole, and we try to identify that top eight or 10% of the entering class. But have it looked like the rest of the university. So we, if we, if we were strictly based on grades and test scores, you know, we could have a year where everybody was in engineering, or everybody was in, in sociology, and part of that is because if imagine every student came from one college, we wouldn't necessarily have the the infrastructure faculty mentor support to help them through the thesis projects, right. So beyond that, we one of the things I'm very proud of is that we are our first year classes actually more diverse than the rest of the university. We're about 30% students of color, which, you know, has been something that I've been very dedicated to creating opportunities for, for access, and inclusion in the Honors College. We're a very queer friendly Honors College, we have a really active and amazing group of student leaders called our student equity action committee, and they help advise me and the faculty associated with the Honors College on on how to, you know, think about being good allies and good support for for non traditional students or from for students from marginalized populations. And it's, it's been a, it's been a it's been a, you know, something that I think the Honors College at UVM. You know, justifiably is proud of how we are leading the university in that regard.

Venkat Raman  24:22  

Just in terms of the student body, the honors college students, a student community, what would be the general profile, you mentioned? 30%, roughly diverse people of color and minorities, and such. What about some of the other factors like maybe just in terms of doctors and disciplines and maybe even geographies?

David J  24:45  [Student Body Profile]

Yeah. So we're, we're pretty close to the rest of the university, as I said, in terms of our mix of majors, so about 50% of our students are in the College of Arts and Sciences. You know, maybe, you know 15% coming from College of Engineering and mathematical sciences, and then you know, they're, they're comparably placed in the other colleges on campus. So the Rubenstein School of the Environment natural resources, the College of Engineering and social services or nursing school, you know, we really, we really do reflect the entire campus. I think the one thing I find, you know, really, you know, maybe a little bit idiosyncratic, is we probably have a higher percentage of students who are pre health or pre med in the Honors College than the rest of the population. But But by and large, we tend to look like what the rest of the student body does.

Venkat Raman  25:53  

One of one other thing was about financial aid and scholarships. I mean, we talked about research and Pell grants and stuff. How about for, for the education itself?

David J  26:08  [Scholarships]

So students at in the Honors College typically receive the one of the highest merit awards that the university offers. Pretty much all of the students at in the Honors College are Presidential Scholars, and that's the highest level of of merit award that that students have. In addition, we have some endowed scholarships in the Honors College, that we're able to give students, many of them kick in as a nice surprise in their sophomore junior and senior years. So we have some really dedicated fans of the Honors College who've contributed scholarships to students in the business school who are in the Honors College. Other scholarships for Vermonters and for students with financial need. And we are very proud of the fact that Senator Patrick Leahy, who's the you know, the, currently the senior most editor in the US Senate and is is retiring this year, has had a scholarship established in his name for what we call the Leahy scholars. And those scholarships are both for tuition, and for some of the opportunities and research funds that I was talking about earlier. So my dream as a as a dean of an Honors College is that is that eventually we'll get to a point where every student is going to receive either a merit award or some research funds or some funds to go abroad. And you know, that's the that's the path I'd like us to be on.

Venkat Raman  27:50  

Yeah, tell us a little bit about the outcomes. What kind of career opportunities do all honors college students typically end up with? And how does that compare with the rest of the university?

David J  28:07  [Career Opportunities]

Yep. So we are pretty successful placing students in in professions and then graduate school, we we are probably waited a little bit heavier to graduate school, I think, sure, not surprisingly, because so many of our students are engaged in research, they end up going into into graduate programs. Later, as I said, I think we have a little bit higher percentage of students who go into the medical fields or health fields, yeah, afterwards. But it's, you know, I know, every university touts these statistics, and we're not we're not different from other universities, but we're about 95% of our students who are in either graduate school or a profession related to their major within six months after after graduating. And, and I always say to parents and students when when they come to visit, I just want them all to know that that other 5% was me. I, I worked as a barista after college for a couple of years. And, and, you know, you know, the fact that I'm the Dean of the Honors College should hopefully give them comfort that even if they don't go immediately to graduate school, it's all going to work out okay.

Venkat Raman  29:26  

Funny. So how was the rest of the university doing? I mean, so what are the questions you probably get, as you know, yeah, I know, you probably don't want to compare too definitively, but just in general, how are the Honors College students doing with the rest of the university?

David J  29:48  

You know, I I am a real proponent of the idea that the Honors College only succeeds to the extent that we're to the extent that we We reflect the rest of the student body in terms of the number of majors and, and, and the distribution of disciplines that students are involved in. I also really believe that, like, we, we are a reflection of the success of the rest of the university. And so, I think that, you know, our students, you know, by and large, they're getting into some of the experiences, that they're going to pursue post UVM, maybe more directly, or, you know, they might have have different opportunities, because they have pursued fellowships like the Fulbright or, or the Truman. But, but by and large, you know, we, we support students around the university generally. And, and so, I think that, you know, when I look at the university, you know, we're a really like, neat and thriving student body that is doing amazing things for themselves. And the Honors College certainly gives our students a leg up in certain settings and in certain applications to graduate school, medical school, some of the business opportunities they get into, but, but, you know, I think we're doing a good job of showing places what UVM can do. And I think UVM students, by and large, are doing amazing things, whether they're in the Honors College or not.

Venkat Raman  31:38  

Okay, so Dave, you're going to start to wind down here. I thought it'd be great if you have you want to share something that we didn't cover. And I honestly want to know more about the barista story and why you became one and why you left that. But if you don't want to talk about it, that's okay.

David J  31:59  

Oh, that's, that's an easy one. So, so my now wife and I, when I graduated from Swarthmore, as an undergraduate, I had no idea what I wanted to do. And, and she was a couple years ahead of me and had been working and, and she wanted to, to change her direction. And we said, well, let's, let's just move somewhere. And this was, this was 1993. So people can do the math and figure out how old I am. But we we said, Well, we, we could go to Seattle, early 90s. That was where everybody was moving. We could go teach English in Japan. But we know we want to drive across country first. And so we we ended up stopping visiting with some friends in Denver, visiting Boulder, Colorado, and, and we loved it. And, and we we stayed in Denver for two years. And I worked first as a barista and then for a publishing company. And, and really, it was through the publishing company that I got to start to work with some of the faculty members that I would eventually work with as a graduate student. And it told me, I was I was doing such exciting things working on some of the book projects of these faculty members that had told me that I didn't really want to be a barista forever. And, and so that's what that's what sent me back to graduate school.

Venkat Raman  33:28  

Great story. No, it's awesome. It's always great to hear these kinds of things. Because like you said, you know, nothing's a straight line. And, and, you know, inspiration comes from millions of things.

David J  33:45  

Yeah. And I mean, I all I often say to people, and I really, I really believe this that I have the best job on on the UVM campus, I get to interact with not just with extraordinary students. And that's, that's kind of the baseline of being the Honors College Dean is I do get to see the real, you know, the real cream of the crop of the entering class each year, then, and the other thing I mentioned is that we do a sophomore, I should have mentioned that we do a sophomore admissions process. So okay, we invite about we have about 100 students who apply to join the Honors College as sophomores. And those students are in some ways, you know, just as as extraordinary as the ones who who we invite as first year students because they really know what the Honors College is all about. And they're so motivated to be here and, and they jump right in and start doing extraordinary things too. But in any case, like being the Dean of the Honors College means getting to work with some really talented, dedicated students, but it also means I get to work with you know, all of the deans around the campus I get to work with different staff members around campus, I get to know the entirety of the university. But, you know, never when I was a 18 year old, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR did I think to myself, You know what I want to be when I grow up the Honors College. But I did, but you wouldn't know that it's such an extraordinary Yeah. And that you get to work with such extraordinary people.

Venkat Raman  35:23  

Yeah, yeah, that's that's sort of the tragedy. You know, at that age, you don't really know what's available, and what's good for you. So an awesome conversation. Thank you so much for taking the time and walking us through UVM Honors College. I would love to talk to you again in the future, but for right now, take care be safe. Thank you so much.

David J  35:45  

Thanks, Venkat I really appreciate it was a pleasure talking to you.

Venkat Raman  35:48  

Likewise, take care.

David J  35:50  

Take care. Bye bye, bye.

--------------------

Venkat  35:56 

Hi again!

Hope you enjoyed our podcast with Dean David Jenemann about the University of Vermont Honors College.

Specifically, Dean Jenemann covered:

  • Highlights of the Honors College Programs;
  • Benefits of Studying at Honors College;
  • How to Apply for Honors College;
  • Study Abroad;
  • Finally, Career Opportunities for their Honors College graduates.

I hope you explore the University of Vermont Honors College for your undergraduate studies.

For your questions or comments on this podcast, please email podcast at almamatters.io [podcast@almamatters.io].

Thank you all so much for listening to our podcast today.

Transcripts for this podcast and previous podcasts are on almamatters.io forward slash podcasts [almamatters.io/podcasts].

To stay connected with us, Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts or Spotify or visit anchor.fm forward slash almamatters [anchor.fm/almamatters] to check us out.

Till we meet again, take care and be safe.

Thank you!

Summary Keywords

Podcast for High Schoolers, College Majors, US Colleges, College Podcast, High School Students, College-bound, Honors College at University of Vermont, UVM, David Jenemann, English.


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